SCIENTIFIC FINDINGS

Remissions are possible

Weight-loss powders, so-called formula diets, help reduce weight quickly. Clinical studies have shown that these can be used successfully with type 2 diabetes and that the symptoms can even disappear permanently. In such cases, the medical profession talks of clinical remission.

Self-monitoring of blood glucose level: control mechanism and motivational engine

The body’s sugar metabolism is impaired in diabetics. Possibly permanently. However, if those affected monitor their blood regularly and adhere strictly to their doctor’s advice, it is usually possible to get the metabolism back to normal.

Lifestyle intervention program trial: a more successful alternative to medication-only therapy

According to a study of type 2 diabetics, medical telemarketing coupled with a change in eating habits can help them reduce their blood glucose and – a pleasant side-effect – lose weight.

Replacing meals with Almased is also beneficial for diabetics

Overweight type 2 diabetics with a high level of insulin resistance can reduce their insulin requirement and their blood glucose (HbA1c), and lose weight, using Almased’s meal replacement product Vitalkost, which is low in calories and rich in protein. That is the result of a preclinical trial carried out by the West-German Centre of Diabetes and Health (WGDZ) of the Association of Catholic Hospitals Dusseldorf (VKKD).

My Health - Diabetes as an Opportunity for a New Start

Professor Stephan Martin, Senior Consultant for Diabetology and Director at the West-German Diabetes Clinic and Health Centre (WDGZ), in an interview with My Health broadcast by RTL on 25 April 2016.

PRACTICAL ADVICE

Trying to save money quickly puts on the pounds

Bargain hunting for food is unhealthy.
Germans have a reputation for being bargain hunters. But sometimes they seem to save money in the wrong places. For some time now, nutrition experts have been criticising the ‘Geiz-ist-geil’ (being stingy is cool) mentality of Germans when it comes to food. It is at variance with a healthy diet in many cases. A British study has now provided proof for something that scientists worldwide have long since accepted: people who base their food purchases excessively on special offers and low prices run the risk of becoming overweight as a consequence. Consumer protection groups have been warning for a long time that food that is particularly cheap is usually not particularly healthy.

Pre-pregnancy overweight poses a risk to mother and child

Women should ensure pre-pregnancy weight is normal.
Women who have a normal body weight before pregnancy have a head start on those women who are overweight. Conversely, pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity mean higher health risks for the expectant mother and her unborn child. That is the finding of an international joint study in which the participating scientists evaluated the data of more than 196,000 women from 25 studies in Europe and North America. According to these studies, a healthy body weight before pregnancy is more important for the well-being of mother and child than the mother’s weight gain during pregnancy. This led the scientists to recommend that mothers should ensure their body mass index (BMI) is within the normal range even before they become pregnant.

Too many energy drinks are harmful to health

Children and adolescents in particular are at risk.
Energy drinks containing caffeine, which are particularly popular among younger people, can cause serious health problems in children and adolescents when consumed excessively. The Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) recently issued a warning. In a report, the federal authority comes to the conclusion that acute moderate consumption of energy drinks by healthy young adults does not lead to undesirable effects if the caffeine intake does not exceed the limits that the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) classifies as being harmless. According to EFSA, children and adolescents should not consume more than a total of 3 milligrams (mg) of caffeine per kilogram (kg) of body weight per day.

10,000 steps a day keep the consequences of inactivity away

Humans are built for movement.
When she sang the title line of her 1960s hit These Boots are Made for Walkin’ it is doubtful that Nancy Sinatra meant the hiking or trekking boots that have become so fashionable of late. She was more interested in settling accounts with her partner than in expressing her wanderlust or the joy of movement. And there is also no need to use hiking boots to complete the 10,000 steps a day recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). That is the amount of daily exercise needed to stay healthy.

Overweight due to overeating

Study: Many people underestimate how much they eat.
Have you heard the saying ‘your eyes must be bigger than your stomach’? As a child I used to hear it from my parents when I filled my plate with more food than I could eat. I heard it particularly often when it was one of my favourite dishes because then I stuffed myself until I couldn’t eat any more. I overindulged all too often. But it is not only children who tend to ‘shovel’ in more food than they really need – and often more than is good for them. In many cases, eating unnecessarily large portions leads to excessive body weight. Researchers have now provided scientific evidence of this.

When stress eating leads to love handles

Emotional eating as the cause of obesity.
Love handles and stress eating are now things of the past. Today we use the term emotional eating to describe people using food to positively influence their mood. But no matter how we describe eating food to help deal with sorrow and stress, it can contribute considerably to overweight. Specialists recommend therefore that we should be consciously aware of the relationship between emotions and eating.

FURTHER INFORMATION

PRACTICAL ADVICE

In our Practical Advice section we regularly publish articles relating to fitness and wellness and provide background information and stories about foodstuffs and dishes.

To the articles

Newsletter

Every month our newsletter reports on topics related to health policy, the current state of medical research and other news and events. The newsletter is free of charge and can be cancelled at any time.

Log in

Newsletter lesen